AMARILLO, Texas (KAMR/KCIT) — What did Americans know, and what more could have been done?

Questions being showcased through the traveling exhibit called “Americans and the Holocaust” which is on display at the Downtown Amarillo Public Library until October 23rd.

This exhibit is free to view.

This exhibition was made possible by the generous support of lead sponsor Jeannie & Jonathan Lavine. Additional major funding was provided by the Bildners—Joan & Allen z”l, Elisa Spungen & Rob, Nancy & Jim; and Jane and Daniel Och.

The Museum’s exhibitions are also supported by the Lester Robbins and Sheila Johnson Robbins Traveling and Special Exhibitions Fund, established in 1990.

When: Saturday, September 17th through Sunday, October 23rd

Where: Amarillo Public Library’s Downtown Library, 413 SE 4th Ave, Amarillo, Texas

Hours: M – TH 9 AM to 9 PM, Fri-Sat 9 AM to 6 PM. Sunday 2 PM to 6PM

Admission: Free

In the fall of 2019, the American Library Association and the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum selected 50 libraries (25 university libraries and 25 public libraries) out of over 250 applicants to host the Americans and the Holocaust traveling exhibit. The Amarillo Public Library is the only public library in the state of Texas among them.

Created through a partnership with the American Library Association and the United State Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington, DC, this 1,100-square-foot exhibition addresses important themes in American history, including Americans’ responses to refugees, war, and genocide in the 1930s and ‘40s. This exhibition challenges the commonly held assumptions that Americans knew little and did nothing about the Nazi persecution and murder of Jews as the Holocaust unfolded.

Drawing on a remarkable collection of primary sources from the 1930s and ‘40s, the exhibition focuses on the stories of individuals and groups of Americans who took action in response to Nazism. It will challenge visitors to consider the responsibilities and obstacles faced by individuals—from President Franklin Delano Roosevelt to ordinary Americans—who made difficult choices, sought to effect change, and, in a few cases, took significant risks to help victims of Nazism even as rescue never became a government priority. The exhibit hopes to challenge people to not only ask “what would I have done?” but also, “what will I do?”

The Americans and the Holocaust exhibit, tours, and  related programs are all free and open to the public.

Acknowledgements:

Americans and the Holocaust: A Traveling Exhibition for Libraries is an educational initiative of the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum and the American Library Association.

The Americans and the Holocaust exhibit was made possible by the generous support of lead sponsors Jeannie and Jonathan Lavine. Additional major funding was provided by the Bildners – Joan & Allen z”l, Eliza Spungen & Rob, Nancy & Jim; and Jane and Daniel Och. The Museum’s exhibitions are also supported by the Lester Robbins and Sheila Johnson Robbins Traveling and Special Exhibitions Fund, established in 1990.