1979 cold case victim identified as Abilene woman

Regional News

Officials: Debra worked at a Ramada Inn — now called Camelot Inn — in Amarillo in 1978

WILLIAMSON COUNTY, Texas (KXAN) — On Wednesday, the Williamson County Sheriff’s Office reported a huge break in a 40-year-old cold case commonly known as the “Orange Socks” Case, with the office announcing it had determined the identity of the victim.

According to WCSO, the victim — a woman whose body was found in a Georgetown-area concrete ditch on Halloween 1979 — has been positively identified as 23-year-old Debra Jackson, of Abilene.

According to the WCSO, Jackson left her family’s home in 1977 and never returned, but her family did not report her as missing since she had disappeared in the past. WCSO says the family believed her to have run away and “moved on.”

Less than two months ago, the WCSO Sheriff tweeted out sketches to re-ignite conversation and hopefully find anyone who might have any information on the victim who was found wearing only the “orange socks” her case would become known for.

(WCSO)

While noted serial killer Henry Lee Lucas confessed to killing the woman and was convicted in 1984, he later recanted his confession before dying in prison in 2001.

WCSO is asking for the public’s assistance in finding out any more information about Jackson, particularly about her whereabouts during the time period of 1977, when she left Abilene, up to her death in Williamson County, in 1979.

Officials and investigators have narrowed the woman’s timeline and locations over these years to roughly:

  • 1977 — Debra was reportedly working somewhere, but it’s not yet known where.
  • 1978 — Debra worked at a Ramada Inn — now called Camelot Inn — in Amarillo.
  • 1978 — Debra worked at an assisted living facility in Azle, Texas

Anyone who may have worked or come into contact with Jackson during this time is asked to call WCSO at (512) 943-5204.

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