On this day in 1912, the Titanic hit an iceberg

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FILE – In this April 10, 1912 file photo the Titanic leaves Southampton, England on her maiden voyage. The salvage firm that has plucked artifacts from the sunken Titanic cruise ship over the decades is seeking a judge’s permission to rescue more items from the rapidly deteriorating wreck. (AP Photo/File)

Harlingen, Texas (KVEO)—Thursday marks the 109th anniversary of the sinking of the Titanic.

On the night of April 14, 1912, the largest and most impressive ship ever built at the time, crashed into an iceberg as it made its way towards New York City.

This 2004 photo provided by the Institute for Exploration, Center for Archaeological Oceanography/University of Rhode Island/NOAA Office of Ocean Exploration, shows the remains of a coat and boots in the mud on the sea bed near the Titanic’s stern. Fallout from the coronavirus pandemic is threatening a company’s plans to retrieve and exhibit the radio that had broadcast distress calls from the sinking vessel, according to a court filing made by the firm on Monday, Jan. 11, 2021. (Institute for Exploration, Center for Archaeological Oceanography/University of Rhode Island/NOAA Office of Ocean Exploration)

More than 15-hundred passengers and crew aboard the British luxury liner the RMS Titanic died when it sank.

The ship was making its maiden voyage from Southampton, England to New York City when it hit an iceberg and sank about 370 miles South of Newfoundland.

It’s considered to be one of the worst maritime disasters in history.

A photo copy provided by RR Auction of a postcard dated May 31, 1911, shows the Titanic, in Belfast, Northern Ireland. The postcard was sent with a message written in March 1912 by Jack Phillips, the Titanic’s senior wireless operator, to his sister. The postcard is to be auctioned by RR Auction. (RR Auction via AP)

People from all walks of life, from upper class citizens to the poor working class, boarded the ship.

While the sinking has been widely investigated over the last century, it is still unclear how exactly the ship came to hit the iceberg.

People have been diving to the Titanic’s wreck for 35 years. No one has found human remains, according to the company that owns the salvage rights.

According to the Associated Press, the fallout from the coronavirus pandemic is threatening RMS Titanic Inc., plans to retrieve and exhibit the radio that had broadcast distress calls from the sinking Titanic.

In this Feb. 18, 2020 file photo, personal effects recovered from the Titanic sit on shelves at a storage facility in Atlanta. A federal judge in Virginia has ruled that a salvage firm can retrieve the Marconi wireless telegraph machine that broadcast distress calls from the sinking Titanic ocean liner. In an order released Monday, May 18, U.S. District Judge Rebecca Beach Smith agreed that the telegraph is historically and culturally important and could soon be lost within the rapidly decaying wreck site. (AP Photo/Angie Wang, File)

The company said in January, that its revenues plummeted after coronavirus restrictions closed its exhibits of Titanic artifacts, causing the firm to seek funding through its parent company. Some of the exhibitions, which are scattered across the country, are still closed, while others that have reopened are seeing limited attendance.

Not only have scientists and scholars been interested in researching the disaster, but it has inspired songs, films, and even a Broadway musical.

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