WTAMU’s nursing program receives accreditation for 10 years

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CANYON, Texas (KAMR/KCIT) — West Texas A&M University’s nursing program received accreditation for the next ten years.

The nursing program at WTAMU has been around since 1974.

“We’ve been here quite a while. We got our initial accreditation with CCNE back in 1999,” Dr. Helen Reyes, Department Head of Nursing at WT, explained.

CCNE, or the Communication on Collegiate Nursing Education, looked over many factors to determine the accreditation time period.

One of those factors being the student’s pass rates for their licensing examinations.

“The first time pass rate. The NCLEX first time pass rate was 97 percent, and within one year 100 percent of our students passed,” Reyes stated.

Currently, WT’s nursing program has its eyes set on future goals.

One of those being tackling mental health by providing nurses with the skills to do so.

“We teach our students not only how to be a nurse in the hospital but how to be a nurse in their community and how to care for the community,”Reyes said.

Aside from mental health, Dr. Reyes said with a nationwide shortage of nurses it is important now more than ever to be able to educate students in the medical field.

They also want to encourage them to take advantage of the many courses and levels they have to offer.

“We need nurses.it’s very important that we not only educate nurses but we educate nurses at the baccalaureate level. We are the only physically located in the panhandle nursing baccalaureate graduate institution,” Reyes said.

For those looking to get into the nursing field Dr. Reyes, said at WT not only will you have a chance to get hands-on experience working with life-sized mannequins in a mock hospital setting.

The nursing program at WT has received several awards in the last few years.

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