CANYON, Texas (KAMR/KCIT) – West Texas A&M University announced that an independent analyst found that its online RN-to-BSN program is the most affordable in the country. TopRNtoBSN.com ranked WT at the top of its 2022 list, up from the previous Number 6 spot in 2021.

The accolade follows another recent announcement from WT, detailing that education resource EDsmart found that the university offers one of the most affordable online degree programs in the country.

“Responsible universities encourage students to complete their program of study, and more than four out of 10 students in our nation who leave college do so for financial reasons,” said Dr. J. Dirk Nelson, dean of WT’s College of Nursing and Health Sciences. “We are very cognizant of the importance of offering outstanding academic programs which lead to excellent employment opportunities while keeping costs low and offering enough flexibility to allow RNs to advance their education while still working full time.”

As noted by WT, registered nurses often choose to pursue a bachelor’s of science in nursing to proceed into management or other healthcare leadership positions, as well as diversify their fields of employment and find opportunities for higher wages. Further, students who hold a BSN degree are also able to pursue a master’s of science in nursing.

While the courses can be tailored to a student’s individual timeline, TopRNtoBSN.com said that the WT program is designed to be completed in one academic year. Further, WT said that it partners with both the BSA Health System and Northwest Texas Healthcare System to allow students to work fewer hours at a designated facility while continuing their education.

As the WT nursing school approaches the 50th anniversary of its first graduates, after being established in 1972 and graduating its first students in 1974, the university continued to promote the benefits of the department’s programs to both individuals and the community. Currently, WT’s Department of Nursing provides around 70% of the nurses employed around the Texas Panhandle.