Experts say this wildfire season could be harsh

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AMARILLO, Texas (KAMR/KCIT) — The National Weather Service in Amarillo is warning that this year may have a harsher wildfire season.

Experts said even though we had a good amount of snow in October, that alone will not be enough to keep the wildfires fires at bay.

“We try to let people know on the days like today where you could have some explosive fire growth those are the days you really need to watch the weather,” Mark Fox, Meteorologist-In-Charge, stated.

High winds, tall dry grasses, and the lack of moisture are creating fuels to spark these fires.

“We also had a very active late summer, early fall where we did get quite a bit of rain so that was very tall grass that is now dormant,” Fox said.

A large part of what the national weather service does is helping to educate the public on safety.

“We try to remind people that it’s never a good idea to throw things out your window like lit cigarettes,” Fox explained.

Chief Meteorologist, John Harris, said though we are in a neutral year we can expect to see these conditions continue if rain or snow does not fall.

“We’re about a quarter of an inch below where we should be for the month of January. Believe it or not is preferred over rain because it stays on the ground for a longer period of time,” Harris stated.

To ensure your safety make sure you are following rules when it comes to burn bans and keeping an eye out for red flag warnings.

You can check if your county is under a burn ban by clicking here.

“If we can keep rain or snow coming in every so often than that will definitely help out as far as keeping that wildfire threat low obviously,” Harris said.

If you do happen to see a wildfire or suspect one is near, get to a point of safety and if you can, try to notify the national weather service of where that fire is.


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