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Women and Depression

1 in 10 adults suffers from long-term depression, and women are more susceptible. But why?
(WTHR)One in ten adults experiences depression, but women are more prone than men. A central Indiana woman talked to Eyewitness News about her battle with depression and what worked for her.

Nakaisha Tolbert Banks felt "off" for weeks before she revealed to her husband that mentally she was in a dark place.

"There are days when you leave and go to work and I am here with the child and I cry all day and I just knew that something wasn't right. So he said schedule another appointment and go in," she recalled.

It was after the birth of her firstborn child, London.

"You are supposed to be so happy and overjoyed and loving this new little blessing that has arrived and all of a sudden you realize, I am not feeling that," Nakaisha explained.

"Bottom line is it needs to be dealt with and treated," said Julie Schneiders, LNP, St. Vincent Health.

Depression - post-partum or otherwise - is something Schneiders says is a higher risk for women. But stigmas make them reluctant to reveal their concerns.

"Don't be afraid," said Schneiders. "If you are coming in for your annual exam...if you are not sleeping, crying all the time; if you have had this major thing happen, talk to us about it. Hopefully you are comfortable enough with your clinician that you can get that out. But there is no stigma here. You would come to us if you were a diabetic. If your blood sugar was off, we can fix that. We can fix this."

There are anti-depressant medications like Zoloft and Prozac. There is also the option of therapy. Plus, you can set goals for yourself like Nakaisha did. She was intentional about ending her isolation.

"I made myself make the phone calls to friends and schedule, even if it just an hour of time to go out and just sit with my girlfriends," she said.

Now London is almost three years old, and with her doctors' help, Nakaisha says she is exercising, eating and sleeping better. She's no longer worried about being a super mom. She's just glad she's a happy mom.

"So much better. I love being a mom and my husband can definitely tell the difference. We can talk about the days when things weren't so happy and bright. I'm just happy to be in a better place. I can stand up and say I feel different. I'm better; I'm happier and I'm just glad to have made it through that," she said.
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