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Southwest Beef Symposium Today and Tomorrow in Clayton, N.M.

The event is jointly hosted by the Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service and New Mexico State University Cooperative Extension Service.
CLAYTON -- The Southwest Beef Symposium is going on today and tomorrow in Clayton.

"This is the 10th year of the Southwest Beef Symposium," said Dr. Ted McCollum, AgriLife Extension beef cattle specialist in Amarillo. "We continue to address issues of concern to the industry at large, but also at the ranch level. This year we are focusing on aspects as the industry hopefully turns a corner and begins to stabilize the national cow inventory and as the weather hopefully turns a corner and allows ranchers to continue the recovery from the drought conditions of the past few years."

Leann Saunders of Castle Rock, Colo., co-founder and president of Where Food Comes From Inc. and chair-elect of the U.S. Meat Export Federation, will open the symposium with a discussion on the Effects of Global Meat Exports on U.S. Beef Producers.

Additional afternoon sessions include: changes in agriculture lending policies, Larry Fluhman, president of Farmers & Stockmens Bank in Clayton; emerging beef sustainability issues, Tom McDonald of JBS Five Rivers Cattle Feeding in Dalhart, Texas and Ben Weinheimer with Texas Cattle Feeders Association in Amarillo, Texas; and a weather outlook.

On Jan. 10, Cooperative Extension Service and AgriLife Extension specialists and university faculty from Kansas State University and New Mexico State University will provide strategies and considerations on rebuilding regional beef herds specifically focused on the economics of re-stocking, defining current pasture lease rates and effectively selecting and managing the nutrition and health programs for stocker calves and cows.

The symposium will wrap up with a panel discussion by regional ranch managers on their individual perspectives of rebuilding regional cattle inventories.

The event is jointly hosted by the Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service and New Mexico State University Cooperative Extension Service.
    
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