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Green Up Makes Potential Fire Fuels

So much green vegetation around the area has been a pleasant sight for the past few weeks. The more live plants there are, the more fuel for wildfires when the weather pattern becomes dry again.
So much green vegetation around the area has been a pleasant sight for the past few weeks. The more live plants there are, the more fuel for wildfires when the weather pattern becomes dry again. The drought over the last few years took it's toll on our landscape, reminding us how Amarillo got it's name in the first place. The yellow and brown fields and yards easily became an eye sore, but then this summer has brought us enough rain to change some of that. Of course, it's not enough rain. It's been erratic, and our rainfall totals are still lower than they should be for this time of year. We're not too far behind, but we continuously need the rain, as regularly as possible to wet down the surface. The green grass and bushes can dry out only after a few weeks of summer heat and strong winds. Once a rain-less pattern starts up, that vegetation will become fuel for new wildfires. The outlook for the next few months is looking better, but firefighters are not naive. They are watching the skies and the weather very closely, for any changes in the more pleasant pattern. Right now, we can just enjoy the scenery. If you're wondering how this year has been, the fires have been fewer and easier to contain.
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