Refugee Causing Strain on Amarillo Resources

Refugee Causing Strain on Amarillo Resources

The meeting has nothing to do with the crisis occurring at the border right now.

AMARILLO -- City leaders are heading to the state capital this week to address refugees coming to Amarillo.


It's an update to a story we first brought you back in February.

Nearly 70,000 refugees fled their home country to avoid persecution last year.

Amarillo has long been a part of the refugee settlement, but now that number is growing too quickly.

In fact, Mayor Harpole says roughly 500 traditional refugees come to our area a year.

That puts us at the highest rate per capita not only in Texas, but in the entire country.

City leaders say the large numbers we're receiving are putting a strain on resources.

Harpole tells us a lot of these refugees are coming to bigger Texas cities, and then ending up in our area because of opportunity like jobs at meat packing plants.

Again, he says they are are welcome, but there needs to be some change made.

He tells us, "we need to talk about equity there. If we're going to do that, how the schools can get more funding and what can be done to support that.  But we really think the numbers have gotten a little outlandish and we need to get that number more in line with what our population is related to what other populations are.   "

State Senator Kel Seliger called for the meeting this week.

The head of the refugee settlement group will be there as well.

Harpole says this meeting has nothing to do with the crisis occurring at the border right now.

He tells us city leaders know of no one trying to send refugees or illegal immigrants here.

He says it's important to make that clear.

The US is one of 24 countries that takes in asylum searchers each year.

The three main countries Amarillo refugees are coming from are Burma, Iraq and Iran.
Page: [[$index + 1]]
comments powered by Disqus