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Immigration Reform

The GOP immigration reform is starting to take shape, but there is still much left to learn.
This week we may see more details on how Republicans hope to fix immigration. 

There's still a big split in the Republican Party on how to go forward. They admit that. And it's not clear what President Obama is willing to accept. 

Just days after laying out a plan that cracked open the door to immigration reform...

Now, Republican leaders say the effort is going nowhere unless we secure America's borders first: "If we can do that where it's security first, no amnesty, then we might be able to get somewhere," said Rep. Paul Ryan, (R) Wisconsin.  

What is still unclear is what the term 'no amnesty' really means . . .

Will the President sign off on a plan that legalizes 11 million immigrants, but does not include a path to citizenship?

Here's what he told CNN - "I'm not going to prejudge what gets to my desk," said President Barack Obama.

"He does not want to see an America where we have two permanent classes - that is to say, citizens and non-citizens," said White House Chief of Staff Denis McDonough.

The other issue is - can Democrats and Republicans trust each other to work this out? 

A lot of Republicans don't like that go-it-alone strategy the President talked about in last week's state of the union. "He's going to do it his own way. That sort of breeds this kind of distrust," said Rep. Eric Cantor, (R) Virginia.  

Paul Ryan now says he doubts we'll see reform happen this year. 

Democrats want to deal with the issues all together, in one big bill - legal status, border patrol, employment verification. Republicans want to take them one by one. 
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