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Antarctica Turbine Tested in the Panhandle

From the tundra to Texas, the Panhandle winds have brought a little piece of Antarctica to the High Plains. A new turbine is being tested at West Texas A&M, that will hopefully be used in Antarctica. "It'll survive 200 mile per hour winds and negative 70 degress farenheit weather," David Carr, Associate Director of Research at the Alternative Energy Institute said.

From the tundra to Texas, the Panhandle winds have brought a little piece of Antarctica to the High Plains. A new turbine is being tested at West Texas A&M, that will hopefully be used in Antarctica.

"It'll survive 200 mile per hour winds and negative 70 degress farenheit weather," David Carr, Associate Director of Research at the Alternative Energy Institute said.

Similar turbines have been used before in Antarctica, but this model has yet to be tested. The Panhandle winds aren't quite 200 miles per hour, but they're providing a good testing ground. The Alternative Energy Institute is excited about the opporunity to test this turbine.

"It's always good when we get new turbines to test, and this one's unique because, you know it's the only turbine that works in Antarctica," Carr said.

The project gives students the chance to get involved as well.

"I think it gives a great opportunity, one for the students to get, you know, actual experience before they graduate," Wesley Warren, a research technician with AEI said.

One student, Korey Carter, has been working at AEI for several years, but he sais he's never worked on something like this.

"Really, I just get a better understanding of what the industry demands are for turbines of this scale and their actual applications," Carter said.

Though the actual application of this turbine will take place across the globe, for the time being, it's making a mark here in the Panhandle.

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